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Florsheim Wingtip Shoes manufactures and sells one of the world's best-known brands of men's dress shoes. These brands--Florsheim Imperial, FLS, @ease, and Florsheim Comfortech--were complemented by the debut of a line of Florsheim golf shoes. In 1997, Florsheim secured several lucrative licensing agreements, and since then has produced John Deere work boots (for Deere & Co.) and Joseph Abboud dress shoes (for upscale designer Joseph Abboud). In addition to operating 350 company-operated stores, Florsheim sells it shoes at over 6,000 department and specialty stores. Two investment groups run by Leon Black own over 67 percent of the company. Founding of a Family Business The company was launched under the name Florsheim & Co. in 1892. Milton Florsheim, the company's founder, sought to produce high quality men's dress shoes at a moderate price, and he opened his first factory in Chicago.

The first Florsheim shoes were made by Milton and his father, Sigmund Florsheim. Florsheim's distribution system was established in the company's infancy. The company provided support for entrepreneurs who wished to set up stores that would sell Florsheim shoes retail. In this way, Florsheim shoes began to go on sale in small towns throughout the United States. Florsheim expanded its distribution system in the early part of the 20th century. Wholesale distribution was set up in several metropolitan areas. Company-owned retail outlets were also established in several cities. These stores were large enough to display and sell the entire line of Florsheim shoes and became the company's flagship operations. In 1929, the company began manufacturing women's shoes.

By 1930, there were five Florsheim factories in Chicago. The shoes were sold through 71 retail outlets, either wholly or partly owned by the company, as well as through nearly 9,000 dealers not directly affiliated with the manufacturer. The company had 2,500 employees by this time. After approaching $3 million in net income in 1929, Florsheim, like most companies dependent on retail sales, was hurt badly by the onset of the Great Depression. By 1931, the company's net income had shrunk to $717,000. As the Depression eased up somewhat in the second half of the 1930s, net income hovered around the $1 million mark, and sales began slowly to climb once again, reaching $9.4 million in 1940. Despite its size, Florsheim was still very much a family operation in the 1930s. Aside from Milton Florsheim, the company's two highest ranking officers in 1930 were his sons, Irving and Harold, who had joined the business in 1914 and 1920, respectively, after graduating from Cornell University. Two other Florsheims, Louis and Felix, also sat on the board of directors.

The Brogue wingtip is a style of low-heeled shoe or boot traditionally characterized by multiple-piece, sturdy leather uppers with decorative holes (or "broguing") and serration along the pieces' visible edges. Modern brogues trace their roots to a rudimentary shoe originating in Scottland and Ireland that was constructed using untanned hide with perforations that allowed water to drain from the shoes when the wearer crossed wet terrain such as a bog. Brogues were traditionally considered to be outdoor or country footwear not otherwise appropriate for casual or business occasions, but brogues are now considered appropriate in most contexts. Brogues are most commonly found in one of four toe cap styles (full or "wingtip", semi-, quarter and longwing) and four closure styles oxford, derby, ghillie and monk. Today, in addition to their typical form of sturdy leather shoes or boots, brogues may also take the form of business dress shoes and sneakers or any other shoe form that utilizes or evokes the multi-piece construction and perforated, serrated piece edges characteristic of brogues.

A dress shoe (U.S. English) is a shoe to be worn at smart casual or more formal events. A dress shoe is typically contrasted to an athletic shoe.

Dress shoes are worn by many as their standard daily shoes, and are widely used in dance, for parties, and for special occasions.

Men's dress shoes are most commonly black or brown. Other possible colors include, burgundy oxblood, chestnut cordovan or white. Cordovan or oxblood shoes are worn sometimes in the United States, while the other colours are worn by men of many nationalities. They are all made of leather, usually entirely, including the outers, lining, and sole, though for more durability at the expense of elegance, many shoes are made with rubber soles.

Shoes are usually made with many pieces of leather, and the seams can be decorated in various ways; most revolve around some type of brogueing. Brogues have rows of decorative punching in patterns: full brogues, or wingtips (the standard American name), have a toe cap in a wavy shape, with punched patterns on various sections of the shoe; half brogues have a normal straight edged toe cap and less punching; finally, other terms such as quarter-brogue etc. may be used to describe progressively less brogueing. All of the standard styles below may be brogued.

Men's shoes are often categorised by their fastening, and the various possibilities are listed below in roughly descending order of formality.

Oxfords (British), or Balmorals (American), lace up and tie to keep them on the wearer's foot, and have a closed lacing, where the pieces of leather joined by the laces are sewn together at the bottom. Many Oxfords have an additional piece of leather sewn over the toe section, known as a toe cap. Oxfords are the standard shoe to wear with most suits.

A monk shoe has no lacing, and is closed by a strap with a buckle.

Derbies, or Blüchers in America, are similar to Oxfords, but have open lacing. They are a little less formal, and are often worn in brown, with some broguering.

Loafers, or slip-ons, come in both men's and women's styles. It is not unusual for a man's loafer to have a tassle, although this can be seen in women's varieties too. Loafers were originally men's shoes, and are usually thought of as such, although women do now wear them.

In addition to the above, there are various less common types of footwear to accompany formal wear, uch as the court shoe (also called opera shoe, or patent pumps) for eveningwear and the dress boot for daywear.

A dress shoe (U.S. English) is a shoe to be worn at smart casual or more formal events. A dress shoe is typically contrasted to an athletic shoe.

Dress shoes are worn by many as their standard daily shoes, and are widely used in dance, for parties, and for special occasions.
Men's dress shoes are most commonly black or brown. Other possible colors include, burgundy oxblood, chestnut cordovan or white. Cordovan or oxblood shoes are worn sometimes in the United States, while the other colours are worn by men of many nationalities. They are all made of leather, usually entirely, including the outers, lining, and sole, though for more durability at the expense of elegance, many shoes are made with rubber soles.

Shoes are usually made with many pieces of leather, and the seams can be decorated in various ways; most revolve around some type of brogueing. Brogues have rows of decorative punching in patterns: full brogues, or wingtips (the standard American name), have a toe cap in a wavy shape, with punched patterns on various sections of the shoe; half brogues have a normal straight edged toe cap and less punching; finally, other terms such as quarter-brogue etc. may be used to describe progressively less brogueing. All of the standard styles below may be brogued.

Men's shoes are often categorised by their fastening, and the various possibilities are listed below in roughly descending order of formality.
Oxfords (British), or Balmorals (American), lace up and tie to keep them on the wearer's foot, and have a closed lacing, where the pieces of leather joined by the laces are sewn together at the bottom. Many Oxfords have an additional piece of leather sewn over the toe section, known as a toe cap. Oxfords are the standard shoe to wear with most suits.

A monk shoe has no lacing, and is closed by a strap with a buckle.

Derbies, or Blüchers in America, are similar to Oxfords, but have open lacing. They are a little less formal, and are often worn in brown, with some broguering.

Loafers, or slip-ons, come in both men's and women's styles. It is not unusual for a man's loafer to have a tassle, although this can be seen in women's varieties too. Loafers were originally men's shoes, and are usually thought of as such, although women do now wear them.
In addition to the above, there are various less common types of footwear to accompany formal wear, uch as the court shoe (also called opera shoe, or patent pumps) for eveningwear and the dress boot for daywear.

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Picture of Florsheim Kenmoor Imperial (Plain Toe)
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$219.95 (USD)

Picture of Florsheim Kenmoor Imperial Wingtip (Polished)
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$219.95 (USD)

Picture of Florsheim Kenmoor Imperial Double Sole Wingtip
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$219.95 (USD)

Picture of Florsheim Kenmoor Imperial Wingtip (Black Grain)
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$219.95 (USD)

Picture of Florsheim Kenmoor Imperiel (Plain Toe)
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$219.95 (USD)

Picture of Florsheim Lexington Cap Toe Oxford (Black)
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$110.00 (USD)
$79.95 (USD)

Picture of Florsheim Lido Softy Slipon (Burgundy)
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$110.00 (USD)
$96.95 (USD)