Mezlan Shoes!

Mezlan Shoes

The Mezlan Shoes family began its legacy in footwear making saddles for generations of European aristocrats. A reputation for fine workmanship and superior craftsmanship, the Mezlan Shoes name has become regarded as one of the finest in the world.

The following selection features our popular Mezlan Shoes styles.

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"A Master Touch of Quality and Craftsmanship" Mezlan shoes, boots, sandals and belts feature a wide selection of genuine exotic skins and fine leathers coupled with world-class craftsmanship setting the standard in the industry for quality and performance. In addition, Mezlan hosiery can supplement your wardrobe with an attractive blend of rich colors and intricate textures. Imported directly from Spain, world-class manufacturers expertly craft fine footwear, belts, and hosiery. "Performance Footwear for the Fashionably Inclined" Bacco Bucci's collection offers a fresh variety of styles, colors, and sizes for your individual needs. Take a moment to review our selection of creative fashions; our footwear is designed to provide an unparalleled fit, comfort, and quality. Designed in Italy, world-class manufacturers expertly craft fine shoes and belts.

An alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae, There are two living alligator species, the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the Chinese Alligator (Alligator sinensis). In addition, several extinct species of alligator are known from fossil remains. Alligators first appeared about 37 million years ago.

A large adult American alligator's weight and length is 800 pounds (360 kg) and 13 feet (4.0 m) long, but can grow to 14.5 feet (4.4 m) long and weigh over 1,000 pounds (450 kg). The largest ever recorded was found in Louisiana and measured 19 feet 2 inches (5.84 m). The Chinese alligator is smaller, rarely exceeding 7 feet (2.1 m) in length. Alligators have an average of 75 teeth.

American Alligators are found in the southeast USA. According to the 2005 Scholastic Book of World Records, Louisiana is the state with the largest alligator population. The majority of American alligators inhabit Florida and Louisiana, with over a million alligators in each state. Southern Florida is the only place where both alligators and crocodiles live side by side.

American alligators live in freshwater environments, such as ponds, marshes, wetlands,rivers, lakes, and swamps, as well as in brackish environments. When they construct gator holes in the wetlands, they increase plant diversity and also provide habitat for other animals during drought periods. They are therefore considered an important species for maintaining ecological diversity in wetlands.

The Chinese Alligator currently is found only in the Yanqtz River valley and is extremely endangered, with only a few dozen believed to be left in the wild. Indeed, far more Chinese alligators live in zoos around the world than can be found in the wild. Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge in southern Louisiana has several in captivity in an attempt to preserve the species. Miami Zoo in Florida also has a breeding pair of Chinese alligators. The St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park has successfully reproduced Chinese Alligators and been fortunate enough to release some of their offspring back into the wild in China

A crocodile is any species belonging to the family Crocodylidae (sometimes classified instead as the subfamily Crocodylinae). The term can also be used more loosely to include all extant members of the order crocodilia i.e. the true crocodiles, the alligators and caimans include prehistoric crocodile relatives and ancestors.

Crocodiles are among the more biologically complex reptiles despite their prehistoric look. Unlike other reptiles, a crocodile has a cortex, a four-chambered heart and the functional equivalent of a diaphragm, by incorporating muscles used for aquatic locomotion into respiration (e.g. m. diaphragmaticus); Its external morphology, on the other hand, is a sign of its aquatic and predatory lifestyle.

A crocodile’s physical traits allow it to be a successful predator,  Its streamlined body enables it to swim swiftly, it also tucks its feet to the side while swimming, which makes it faster by decreasing water resistance. Its webbed feet, though not used to propel the animal through the water, allow it to make fast turns and sudden moves in the water or initiate swimming. Webbed feet are an advantage in shallower water where the animal sometimes moves around by walking.

Crocodiles have a palatal flap, a rigid tissue at the back of the mouth that blocks the entry of water. The palate has a special path from the nostril to the glottis that bypasses the mouth. The nostrils are closed during submergence. The walls of the braincase are bony, but lack supratemporal and postfrontal bones. Their tongues are not free, but held in place by a membrane which limits movement; as a result, crocodiles are unable to stick out their tongues.

Crocodilian scales have pores believed to be sensory in function, analogous to the lateral line in fishes. They are particularly seen on their upper and lower jaws. Another possibility is they are secretory, as they produce an oily substance that appears to flush mud off.

Crocodiles are very fast over short distances, even out of water. Since they feed by grabbing and holding onto their prey, they have evolved sharp teeth for tearing and holding onto flesh, and powerful muscles to close the jaws and hold them shut. These jaws can bite down with immense force, by far the strongest bite of any animal. The pressure of the crocodile's bite is more than 5,000 pounds per square inch.

The jaws are opened, however, by a very weak set of muscles. Crocodiles can thus be subdued for study or transport by taping their jaws or holding their jaws shut with large rubber bands cut from automobile inner tubes. They have limited lateral (side-to-side) neck movement.

A dress shoe (U.S. English) is a shoe to be worn at smart casual or more formal events. A dress shoe is typically contrasted to an athletic shoe.

Dress shoes are worn by many as their standard daily shoes, and are widely used in dance, for parties, and for special occasions.

Men's dress shoes are most commonly black or brown. Other possible colors include, burgundy oxblood, chestnut cordovan or white. Cordovan or oxblood shoes are worn sometimes in the United States, while the other colours are worn by men of many nationalities. They are all made of leather, usually entirely, including the outers, lining, and sole, though for more durability at the expense of elegance, many shoes are made with rubber soles.

Shoes are usually made with many pieces of leather, and the seams can be decorated in various ways; most revolve around some type of brogueing. Brogues have rows of decorative punching in patterns: full brogues, or wingtips (the standard American name), have a toe cap in a wavy shape, with punched patterns on various sections of the shoe; half brogues have a normal straight edged toe cap and less punching; finally, other terms such as quarter-brogue etc. may be used to describe progressively less brogueing. All of the standard styles below may be brogued.

Men's shoes are often categorised by their fastening, and the various possibilities are listed below in roughly descending order of formality.

 Oxfords (British), or Balmorals (American), lace up and tie to keep them on the wearer's foot, and have a closed lacing, where the pieces of leather joined by the laces are sewn together at the bottom. Many Oxfords have an additional piece of leather sewn over the toe section, known as a toe cap. Oxfords are the standard shoe to wear with most suits.

A monk shoe has no lacing, and is closed by a strap with a buckle.

Derbies, or Blüchers in America, are similar to Oxfords, but have open lacing. They are a little less formal, and are often worn in brown, with some broguering.

Loafers, or slip-ons, come in both men's and women's styles. It is not unusual for a man's loafer to have a tassle, although this can be seen in women's varieties too. Loafers were originally men's shoes, and are usually thought of as such, although women do now wear them.

In addition to the above, there are various less common types of footwear to accompany formal wear, uch as the court shoe (also called opera shoe, or patent pumps) for eveningwear and the dress boot for daywear.

A dress shoe (U.S. English) is a shoe to be worn at smart casual or more formal events. A dress shoe is typically contrasted to an athletic shoe.

Dress shoes are worn by many as their standard daily shoes, and are widely used in dance, for parties, and for special occasions.
Men's dress shoes are most commonly black or brown. Other possible colors include, burgundy oxblood, chestnut cordovan or white. Cordovan or oxblood shoes are worn sometimes in the United States, while the other colours are worn by men of many nationalities. They are all made of leather, usually entirely, including the outers, lining, and sole, though for more durability at the expense of elegance, many shoes are made with rubber soles.
 

Shoes are usually made with many pieces of leather, and the seams can be decorated in various ways; most revolve around some type of brogueing. Brogues have rows of decorative punching in patterns: full brogues, or wingtips (the standard American name), have a toe cap in a wavy shape, with punched patterns on various sections of the shoe; half brogues have a normal straight edged toe cap and less punching; finally, other terms such as quarter-brogue etc. may be used to describe progressively less brogueing. All of the standard styles below may be brogued.
 

Men's shoes are often categorised by their fastening, and the various possibilities are listed below in roughly descending order of formality.
Oxfords (British), or Balmorals (American), lace up and tie to keep them on the wearer's foot, and have a closed lacing, where the pieces of leather joined by the laces are sewn together at the bottom. Many Oxfords have an additional piece of leather sewn over the toe section, known as a toe cap. Oxfords are the standard shoe to wear with most suits.

A monk shoe has no lacing, and is closed by a strap with a buckle.

Derbies, or Blüchers in America, are similar to Oxfords, but have open lacing. They are a little less formal, and are often worn in brown, with some broguering.

Loafers, or slip-ons, come in both men's and women's styles. It is not unusual for a man's loafer to have a tassle, although this can be seen in women's varieties too. Loafers were originally men's shoes, and are usually thought of as such, although women do now wear them.
In addition to the above, there are various less common types of footwear to accompany formal wear, uch as the court shoe (also called opera shoe, or patent pumps) for eveningwear and the dress boot for daywear.

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Picture of Mezlan Bradley Slipon
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Mezlan shoe

$275.00 (USD)

Picture of Mezlan Bradley Slipon
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Mezlan shoe

$275.00 (USD)

Picture of Mezlan Concerto Formal Oxford (Black/Patent)
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Mezlan shoe

$295.00 (USD)

Picture of Mezlan Hundley Split Toe Oxford
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Mezlan shoe

$275.00 (USD)

Picture of Mezlan Hundley Split Toe Oxford
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Mezlan shoe

$275.00 (USD)