Bass Logan Leavitt Shoes!

Bass Logan Leavitt Penny Loafer Shoes

The following selection features our most popular Bass Logan Leavitt Shoe styles.

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Wilton is known for being the location of Maine's first cotton mill, started in 1810 by Solomon Adams. In 1876, George Henry Bass (1855–1925) founded G. H. Bass & Co. and became the best-known businessman in Wilton's history. Bass shoes (including those worn during expeditions to Antarctica) were made exclusively in Wilton for more than a century until 1998. By then the Bass shoe family had sold out and in 1998 Bass' parent company, moved the Bass shoe operations overseas.

John Russell Bass (b. 1878), son of G. H. Bass, was treasurer for the firm and served as Maine delegate to the Republican national convention in 1920, 1944 and 1952. The company built much of its success on the Bass penny weejun shoe design introduced in 1936 and said to be based on Norwegian fisherman's shoes. The style was an instant hit, and became a staple on college campuses across the nation. The shoe was later renamed the Leavitt penny weejun shoe; it is no longer made in Wilton.

A shoe is an item of footwear intended to protect and comfort the human foot while doing various activities. Shoes are also used as an item of decoration. The design of shoes has varied enormously through time and from culture to culture, with appearance originally being tied to function. Additionally fashion has often dictated many design elements, such as whether shoes have very high heels or flat ones. Contemporary footwear varies widely in style, complexity and cost. Basic sandals may consist of only a thin sole and simple strap. High fashion shoes may be made of very expensive materials in complex construction and sell for thousands of dollars a pair. Other shoes are for very specific purposes, such as boots specially designed for hiking and skiing.

Shoes have traditionally been made from leather wood or canvas but are increasingly made from rubber, plastics and other derived materials.

The foot contains more bones than any other single part of the body. Though it has evolved over hundreds of thousands of years in relation to vastly varied terrqain and climate conditions, the foot is still vulnerable to environmental hazards such as sharp rocks and hot ground, against which shoes can protect.

A dress shoe (U.S. English) is a shoe to be worn at smart casual or more formal events. A dress shoe is typically contrasted to an athletic shoe.

Dress shoes are worn by many as their standard daily shoes, and are widely used in dance, for parties, and for special occasions.

Men's dress shoes are most commonly black or brown. Other possible colors include, burgundy oxblood, chestnut cordovan or white. Cordovan or oxblood shoes are worn sometimes in the United States, while the other colours are worn by men of many nationalities. They are all made of leather, usually entirely, including the outers, lining, and sole, though for more durability at the expense of elegance, many shoes are made with rubber soles.

Shoes are usually made with many pieces of leather, and the seams can be decorated in various ways; most revolve around some type of brogueing. Brogues have rows of decorative punching in patterns: full brogues, or wingtips (the standard American name), have a toe cap in a wavy shape, with punched patterns on various sections of the shoe; half brogues have a normal straight edged toe cap and less punching; finally, other terms such as quarter-brogue etc. may be used to describe progressively less brogueing. All of the standard styles below may be brogued.

Men's shoes are often categorised by their fastening, and the various possibilities are listed below in roughly descending order of formality.

 Oxfords (British), or Balmorals (American), lace up and tie to keep them on the wearer's foot, and have a closed lacing, where the pieces of leather joined by the laces are sewn together at the bottom. Many Oxfords have an additional piece of leather sewn over the toe section, known as a toe cap. Oxfords are the standard shoe to wear with most suits.

A monk shoe has no lacing, and is closed by a strap with a buckle.

Derbies, or Blüchers in America, are similar to Oxfords, but have open lacing. They are a little less formal, and are often worn in brown, with some broguering.

Loafers, or slip-ons, come in both men's and women's styles. It is not unusual for a man's loafer to have a tassle, although this can be seen in women's varieties too. Loafers were originally men's shoes, and are usually thought of as such, although women do now wear them.

In addition to the above, there are various less common types of footwear to accompany formal wear, uch as the court shoe (also called opera shoe, or patent pumps) for eveningwear and the dress boot for daywear.

A dress shoe (U.S. English) is a shoe to be worn at smart casual or more formal events. A dress shoe is typically contrasted to an athletic shoe.

Dress shoes are worn by many as their standard daily shoes, and are widely used in dance, for parties, and for special occasions.
Men's dress shoes are most commonly black or brown. Other possible colors include, burgundy oxblood, chestnut cordovan or white. Cordovan or oxblood shoes are worn sometimes in the United States, while the other colours are worn by men of many nationalities. They are all made of leather, usually entirely, including the outers, lining, and sole, though for more durability at the expense of elegance, many shoes are made with rubber soles.

Shoes are usually made with many pieces of leather, and the seams can be decorated in various ways; most revolve around some type of brogueing. Brogues have rows of decorative punching in patterns: full brogues, or wingtips (the standard American name), have a toe cap in a wavy shape, with punched patterns on various sections of the shoe; half brogues have a normal straight edged toe cap and less punching; finally, other terms such as quarter-brogue etc. may be used to describe progressively less brogueing. All of the standard styles below may be brogued.

Men's shoes are often categorised by their fastening, and the various possibilities are listed below in roughly descending order of formality.
Oxfords (British), or Balmorals (American), lace up and tie to keep them on the wearer's foot, and have a closed lacing, where the pieces of leather joined by the laces are sewn together at the bottom. Many Oxfords have an additional piece of leather sewn over the toe section, known as a toe cap. Oxfords are the standard shoe to wear with most suits.

A monk shoe has no lacing, and is closed by a strap with a buckle.

Derbies, or Blüchers in America, are similar to Oxfords, but have open lacing. They are a little less formal, and are often worn in brown, with some broguering.

Loafers, or slip-ons, come in both men's and women's styles. It is not unusual for a man's loafer to have a tassle, although this can be seen in women's varieties too. Loafers were originally men's shoes, and are usually thought of as such, although women do now wear them.
In addition to the above, there are various less common types of footwear to accompany formal wear, uch as the court shoe (also called opera shoe, or patent pumps) for eveningwear and the dress boot for daywear.

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Picture of Bass Weejun Leavitt Logan Penny
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Bass shoe
$108.00 (USD)
$88.95 (USD)

Picture of Bass Weejun Leavitt Logan Penny
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Bass shoe
$108.00 (USD)
$88.95 (USD)

Picture of Bass Weejuns Larson Beef Roll Penny
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Bass shoe
$109.00 (USD)
$88.95 (USD)

Picture of Bass Weejuns Layton Kilti Tassel
Click on the picture to see a larger image and more information about this Bass shoe
$109.00 (USD)
$88.95 (USD)